O人tation (O-“ren”-tation): How Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre’s Permanent Exhibition Negotiates Local Chineseness

One foreign ambassador asked me why it was necessary in Singapore to have both a China Cultural Centre and a Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre.I replied that it was absolutely necessary to separate the two or else there will be confusion. I suspect that he was testing me.George Yeo Asserting yourself globally is hard because countries … Continue reading O人tation (O-“ren”-tation): How Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre’s Permanent Exhibition Negotiates Local Chineseness

Style and Sincerity: Some Thoughts on Singapore’s Ethnic PSA Videos

I'm a bit late to the party, but I only just chanced upon this series of Tamil PSAs on CHAS and "Adapt and Grow" skills upgrading programmes. Since these PSAs aired during the recent Deepavali festive season, they were conceptualised as riffs off the Indian palace drama genre, much like how the Health Promotion Board … Continue reading Style and Sincerity: Some Thoughts on Singapore’s Ethnic PSA Videos

Visual Poetry: The Twin Cinema of Race and Ritual in “Religious Procession” (2019)

As Kopimotion's last article has shown, race is a trigger topic in Singapore's media landscape. As a concept that structures our thoughts and policies, race entrenches ways of categorising and dominating people through the enforcement of difference. This fixation on classifying people also becomes the dominant mode of thought within which we develop our own … Continue reading Visual Poetry: The Twin Cinema of Race and Ritual in “Religious Procession” (2019)

我的名字是个名牌 (My Name Is a Premium Brand): Preetipls, Humour, Anger, Race and Chinese Privilege

Look, I am angry. I apologise. I do, I apologise. [. . .] It’s not my place to be angry on a comedy stage. I’m meant to be doing… self-deprecating humour. People feel safer when men do the angry comedy. They’re the kings of the genre. When I do it, I’m a miserable lesbian, ruining … Continue reading 我的名字是个名牌 (My Name Is a Premium Brand): Preetipls, Humour, Anger, Race and Chinese Privilege

“Have You Ever Wondered?” Stories, Belief and Identity in “23:59” (2011)

Content Warning: Death, Violence, Implied Homophobia/Transmisogyny What do a country and the army have in common? Both are held together by stories. When someone says that they feel like part of a larger body - say, the shared experience of National Service or a sense of Singaporeanness - their sense of insidership is produced through … Continue reading “Have You Ever Wondered?” Stories, Belief and Identity in “23:59” (2011)