O人tation (O-“ren”-tation): How Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre’s Permanent Exhibition Negotiates Local Chineseness

One foreign ambassador asked me why it was necessary in Singapore to have both a China Cultural Centre and a Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre.I replied that it was absolutely necessary to separate the two or else there will be confusion. I suspect that he was testing me.George Yeo Asserting yourself globally is hard because countries … Continue reading O人tation (O-“ren”-tation): How Singapore Chinese Cultural Centre’s Permanent Exhibition Negotiates Local Chineseness

Nearly Headless Chickens: “New Resident” (2020)

New Resident (2020) is one of those films in which what happens around the film is almost as interesting as the film itself. As director Jun Chong reveals in the Facebook post accompanying New Resident's online premiere, New Resident has been influenced by - and has also influenced - the neighbourhood-level politics of Sin Ming … Continue reading Nearly Headless Chickens: “New Resident” (2020)

Looking and Knowing in “Wet Season” (2019)

Thirty spokes converge on a hubbut it’s the emptinessthat makes a wheel workpots are fashioned from claybut it’s the hollowthat makes a pot workwindows and doors are carved for a housebut it’s the spacesthat make a house workexistence makes a thing usefulbut nonexistence makes it workDao De Jing 11:1-2, Red Pine translation In his post-screening … Continue reading Looking and Knowing in “Wet Season” (2019)

“A Land Imagined” (2018): Radical Inclusion at the Borders of Being

A Land Imagined (2018) is not an easy film to watch - and I mean this in the best way possible. Loosening the structures of narrative and form, A Land Imagined demands persistence as it dissolves the boundaries of person, culture and nation. Tied into this dynamic is a difficult ethical question that everyday life evades: where does … Continue reading “A Land Imagined” (2018): Radical Inclusion at the Borders of Being

我的名字是个名牌 (My Name Is a Premium Brand): Preetipls, Humour, Anger, Race and Chinese Privilege

Look, I am angry. I apologise. I do, I apologise. [. . .] It’s not my place to be angry on a comedy stage. I’m meant to be doing… self-deprecating humour. People feel safer when men do the angry comedy. They’re the kings of the genre. When I do it, I’m a miserable lesbian, ruining … Continue reading 我的名字是个名牌 (My Name Is a Premium Brand): Preetipls, Humour, Anger, Race and Chinese Privilege